Illustration and Design

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Sherlock Art Nouveau
Dear God, what is it like in your funny little brains?
Based on the classic Mucha poster Princezna Hyacinta (Princess Hyacinth). Sherlock has so many quirks and idiosyncrasies that it was fun to brainstorm the visual elements for this piece. The bees are a nod to the original books where Sherlock keeps bees in his retirement, something that the BBC show also has fun with, (for instance, one of the cupboards at 221B Baker Street has a honeycomb pattern on the door!) and also, I think Sherlock’s mind is probably rather like a beehive, organized and functional and always busy, always buzzing. It seemed an appropriate visual. The three molecular diagrams are for nicotine, adrenaline, and dopamine (an addiction hormone). The pattern behind Sherlock is part of a map of London, specifically Brixton, which is the area where they found the last body in A Study in Pink.
I originally drew this without the riding crop. I was going to put up both versions but you know what, everyone likes this one better, so, here. Much thanks to allthebellsinvenice for suggestions and critiques!
Prints are available here on my redbubble account. Please note that the image on redbubble is lighter than the print you will receive. I ordered a test print myself before I put this up and I’m pleased with the colours.
Also in this series: Molly Hooper. Next up: John Watson.

Sherlock Art Nouveau

Dear God, what is it like in your funny little brains?

Based on the classic Mucha poster Princezna Hyacinta (Princess Hyacinth). Sherlock has so many quirks and idiosyncrasies that it was fun to brainstorm the visual elements for this piece. The bees are a nod to the original books where Sherlock keeps bees in his retirement, something that the BBC show also has fun with, (for instance, one of the cupboards at 221B Baker Street has a honeycomb pattern on the door!) and also, I think Sherlock’s mind is probably rather like a beehive, organized and functional and always busy, always buzzing. It seemed an appropriate visual. The three molecular diagrams are for nicotine, adrenaline, and dopamine (an addiction hormone). The pattern behind Sherlock is part of a map of London, specifically Brixton, which is the area where they found the last body in A Study in Pink.

I originally drew this without the riding crop. I was going to put up both versions but you know what, everyone likes this one better, so, here. Much thanks to allthebellsinvenice for suggestions and critiques!

Prints are available here on my redbubble account. Please note that the image on redbubble is lighter than the print you will receive. I ordered a test print myself before I put this up and I’m pleased with the colours.

Also in this series: Molly Hooper. Next up: John Watson.

Filed under sherlock mucha art nouveau princess hyacinth benedict cumberbatch

45,589 notes

touay:

“youre so lucky that you can draw”

yyeah it was all luck and not at all grueling and emotionally exhausting practice kind of like how olympians are lucky that theyre so good at sports

No one is born an artist. The only thing that makes an artist different from any other random person is a willingness to practice art. I have met a very small number of people who do indeed seem to have a special gift for observation and a sense of space and layout that I don’t think is really teachable. But every artist, even the ones with a natural superior talent for observation, has become the artist they are now because of hours and hours and hours of practice, and often tens of thousands of dollars of school classes.

To say that we are “lucky” or “gifted” kind of erases the amount of effort we’ve put in to our craft. It erases all the childhood afternoons we spent scribbling ideas from our imagination, it erases the time we had to spend experimenting and learning how to properly use different media, it erases the classes that we took, it erases the long hours of homework for those classes, and it erases the effort that goes in to each piece, the research, the rough drafts, the critical eye we must apply to identify and correct problems…

There’s nothing lucky about it. The only lucky thing was that we grew up with a delight for putting marks on paper. Everything else is work and learnable skills.

(Source: ghouladult-deactivated0234761, via geothebio)

Filed under artist whining

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Ooooooh my Sherlock test print from Redbubble arrived in the mail today…

So the colour matching is… excellent! It’s lovely! The print is gorgeous and crisp, packaged securely, arrived super fast, and the colours are literally almost perfect. It really puts my local print shop to shame. I wish I could afford to print through Redbubble when I start doing artist alleys next year. (unfortunately it’s the difference between two dollars and fifteen dollars a print!)

So that went even better than I hoped, and I will be posting it later tonight. I hope you guys all like it…

Filed under redbubble babble

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The Sherlock poster is done! I’ve ordered a test print from Redbubble to make sure the dark purple is going to print properly, and if that ends up going well, I’ll put it up here in 5-10 business days. (come on, Redbubble. These prints are expensive. The least you can do is make sure they look nice) In the meantime, here’s a little teaser: This is the Mucha poster I based it off of.

Next up is a poster for John. Not gonna lie, he’s going to be tricky. Compared to the other characters in the series, John is a more neutral, balanced, everyman character that isn’t as easy to boil down into visual themes and motifs. I have one idea that might work, but I have to find a good Mucha poster first.

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Society6 vs Redbubble

Does anyone have any opinions they could share with me as to the art print quality of society6 vs redbubble? Specifically how well the prints match the images you see on your screen? (and any other comments or concerns?)

I’ve been googling and I’ve seen a significant portion of people say that redbubble sometimes prints too dark. In fact there’s even a note about it in their FAQ. (that basically just says yes your print might look darker than the image you see on the screen)

And I’ve also seen some comparison photos of society6 prints and the colour matching looks excellent.

The poster I’m currently working on is going to need good colour matching or it’s going to print way too dark. I can, of course, correct the colours myself, but how do I know what their crazy machines are calibrated at, without ordering a bunch of expensive test prints? These print-on-demand sites are great for small-time artists because they take care of the payment, printing and shipping for me, but I’m really really picky and I want to be able to offer people the best quality prints. Especially considering the bloody huge percentage they take from each sale.

Anyway folks, if you have any experience along these lines with the photo prints from these sites, seriously please send me a note or something.

Filed under society6 redbubble

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Sooooo I’m almost done my Sherlock art nouveau poster! Yay! Pretty much just adjusting the colours and getting it print ready! Yay! By special request, there will even be an alternate version! Yay!

HOWEVER

The colour scheme I’ve chosen (lots of dark purples) is very tricky to print and needs very specific colour matching, which is extra tricky when I’m sending it off to redbubble. I can’t just send test prints back and forth like I do with my local print shops. But, I can’t have customers paying money and receiving awful prints. So I’m going to have to get this figured out before I make it publicly available!

Filed under artist whining

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Whenever there’s an unusually cold/snowy day: “HURR HURR HOW BOUT THAT GLOBAL WARMING”

Idiots.